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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hey all,

I'm a new owner of a CT200H. I recently bought a 2015 base model in October 2017 and absolutely love it. This is my first vehicle newer than 2005, so some of the newer technologies are unfamiliar to me. I had one problem with the CT and I'd like to have a better understand of why this is happening.

I'm from NJ and of course we get some snow here. When I drive the car in 3" of powdered snow, such as in a parking lot (or my driveway) that hasn't been plowed, the car struggles. What I mean by that is, if I temporarily disable the traction control system via the button on the dash and switch the car to "Sport Mode", when I floor the car to intentionally spin the tires to a desired higher RPM in order to gain traction, the car automatically throttles back the engine while the pedal is still on the floor. I thought disabling the TCS would give me full control of the car's throttle.

I first noticed this first when I pulled into a parking lot that had a little more than 3" of snow on the ground. The CT literally just plowed into the snow and completely stopped. It was on level ground. Fortunately for me my back tires still were on clean pavement and I was able to aggressively rock the car out and back onto the main road. This is when I first noticed the car wouldn't let me continuously spin the tires with the TCS disabled.

Currently, it is snowing now and I measured the snow in the parking lot my car is parked in. It's just a hair over 3" and is fresh snow. I attempted to drive in it and for experimental purposes, I floored the car once again to see how it would behave. As I suspected, the car throttles the engine back and won't really go above 2k RPMS's in sport mode with TCS disabled.

Why is this happening?

Is this happening because the car is a hybrid?

Is this a result of how newer cars behave in the snow?

Is this a Toyota/Lexus thing?


Thanks in advance to those who comment!
 

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On older Toyota's It used to be the tracs off button , if you held it in for like 10 seconds in park. Would turn off all of the nanny controls instead of just some like if you hit the switch quick. Might be worth a try.
Haven't played with that switch yet myself
 

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Discussion Starter #3
On older Toyota's It used to be the tracs off button , if you held it in for like 10 seconds in park. Would turn off all of the nanny controls instead of just some like if you hit the switch quick. Might be worth a try.
Haven't played with that switch yet myself
I'm not looking to disable the features of the car. I'm wanting to understand what I had asked in my initial post.
 

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I ve experienced the same thing( it s a 2014) and didn't liked, but i think it s a toyota thing. Some systems are more permissive or efficient than others, not this one.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I ve experienced the same thing( it s a 2014) and didn't liked, but i think it s a toyota thing. Some systems are more permissive or efficient than others, not this one.

That's a huge bummer for me. I might have selected a different vehicle for my needs if I knew this before making my purchase.
 

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That's a huge bummer for me. I might have selected a different vehicle for my needs if I knew this before making my purchase.
I think snow storms are pretty much over this winter, so i cannot test the 10 sec hold button to deactivate the system.

Do you have winter tires?

If you find this system annoying or intrusive, wait and see the safety features in future and "autonomous" vehicles.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
That's a huge bummer for me. I might have selected a different vehicle for my needs if I knew this before making my purchase.
I think snow storms are pretty much over this winter, so i cannot test the 10 sec hold button to deactivate the system.

Do you have winter tires?

If you find this system annoying or intrusive, wait and see the safety features in future and "autonomous" vehicles.
I don't have winter tires because I was afraid it wouldn't solve this issue. In my previous 95 Honda Civic, I was able to use winter tires and essentially get up my fairly steep driveway in the snow with relative ease. Winter tires for the CT are so expensive I don't know if it would be worth it if it can't accomplish the same as my previous car with them.
 

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Winter tires aren't cheap for the ct, but the extra grip they offer is very much appreciated.

We have a law here that you must have winter tires installed from dec. 15th to march 15th.
Since i don t do much mileage all year long,my winter tires last at least 10 years.
Having an extra set of wheels for winter helps a lot. My winter set goes in the day before the first snowstorm or dec. 14 and comes out the 16th of march when there s no snow on forecast.
 

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This is happening due to the hybrid system. If the traction control system detects slippage, it will cut power to the wheels to prevent damage to the electric motor/regen system. It's really annoying, but at least you have a trac off button (which kinda turns it off).
Mine doesn't even have that. Chicago winters can be bad, but tires do help. I don't run winter tires, but I do have upgraded all-seasons and the car does far better than with the OEM wheels.

BTW, holding park doesn't do it, there's some crazy dance you need to do to deactivate traction control. I tried it when I had my Prius and could never quite get the timing down.
 

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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
I tested my driveway today in 10F here on the East Coast. It's very icy out. Keep in mind, I did this test with traction control off and on, in all modes of driving (eco, sport, normal). I attempted to drive to the highest incline of my driveway and come to a full stop. I then tried to slowly creep up the driveway until the car wouldn't continue and continued to slip. In the photos I posted below, the car stopped where you see it and could NOT go any further up the hill without momentum. The tires literally could not get any grip and would spin with even the LEAST amount of throttle. I do have dedicated snow tires and rims on.

I tried the same exact test with a 2009 (around that year) Audi A3 AWD on all-season tires and it performed perfectly. It didn't get hung up on anything. I'm blown away at how easily it handled the entire driveway.

I think the main/major difference between the two cars is simply the AWD system? Am I missing something here? If that's the case, I'm getting an AWD car as my next purchase.







 

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Apparently all season tires become too hard around 40F.

Last week, here, we had 5" of snow during the day and 1/2" of rain the whole night.
My driveway was covered with ice and i tried to pull the CT in the garage. From the middle of the driveway(30' long), i couldn't back it up and it only drops 2 foot to the street.
I have Michelin Xice3 installed and i had to go to the middle off the street to get some speed, otherwise it was impossible to back up( with or without the traction control)
 

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Discussion Starter #15 (Edited)
Your experience is spot on to mine!

I'm re-reading the previous posts in this thread. I see that previous users have mentioned this is due to the hybrid system protecting the motors.

I'm curious to know how an AWD hybrid would handle your driveway and mine?

I'm also wondering if I got an NX all-wheel drive hybrid would I experience the same issues?
 
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