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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,
I needed to get my teen a cool ride that is safe as well.
I suggested Prius, he warned me that he would never talk to me again. I showed him pictures of CT and he fell for it.
It has close to 150K, drove it from a dealership that was three hours away and came with a five day money back guarantee.I got the pre purchase inspection done at a local, independent shop and the report came back "great"
Day six, the infamous rattle at startup and the bright yellow CEL, so I spent the last weekend taking care of that. The car seems to be driving much better, no rattling start, or may be I am being optimistic and the MPG is now up by five. This morning I got 48 on freeway.
Here are the steps:
  1. Tools needed for getting the valve and the cooling unit off
    1. 10mm, 12mm sockets with appropriate ratchets
    2. 12 mm ratcheting spanner
    3. 6mm Socket to remove the threaded rod that screws into the engine case and then you put the 12mm nut on it.
    4. Phillips head screwdriver
    5. crooked pliers to release the pressure from hose clamps
    6. old grocery plastic bags to be used as plugs to prevent the coolant from gushing out and a large
    7. flat lid of a big plastic tote to be used to catch little bit of coolant that will eventually drip out.
  2. Cleaning supplies and DIY tools
    1. Parts and brake cleaner, get ten cans. I used eight
    2. Steel wire, 16 gauge. Make sure it is steel, not aluminum or copper. You need it to drive through the plugged up holes in the cooler.
    3. Drill driver to rotate the wire as you clean each hole
The steps I followed
  1. Please do not undertake this if the engine is hot. I started the process with the car parked overnight.
  2. The EGR pipe that comes into the filter housing, has a plastic cover, move the wiring harness aside and remove the 10mm bolt that holds the plastic case in place. It is secured on to the EGR pipe flange.
  3. Now you can see the two 10mm bolts that secure the EGR pipe to the filter housing, remove them.
  4. Remove the air filter housing by undoing the clips and then taking out the two 10MM bolts that hold the whole thing in place, leave the bolts in the plastic housing.
  5. Loosen the hose clam and just rotate it 180 degrees so it's out of the way. I did not take it off, didn't need to.
  6. Move on to the EGR valve side and remove the two 10mm bolts that will let you get the pipe off, set it aside along with the five 10MM bolts.
  7. The EGR valve has a 12mm nut that secures it o the engine block, remove that and follow it up by removing the threaded rod with a 6mm socket head.
  8. The EGR valve is secured to the cooler, the rectangular SS box that brings in exhaust gases back to the engine, now this thing has four 12 mm bolts, the first one to take off is on top of the cooler, you will see a SS bracket that is mounted on to the engine case.
  9. The next two you want to tackle are at the connection between this part and a tube coming from the exhaust system. You will need a ratcheting spanner, 12MM, will need to lay on the engine, stick your arm behind the block and then get the spanner on the bolt.
  10. As you are doing the above steps, keep removing the hoses that are connected to this cooler, keep a ball of plastic bag ready and plug the hole to avoid spills, worked well for me.
  11. The last bolt is underneath the cooler and it is really easy to get to if you have the right size socket with the right size extension. When looking down at the part, you can see the top of the bracket, the bolt is right below that. I did not have the right size extension, but managed with what I had.
  12. Ideally, you want to remove the threaded rod that the lower bolt is fastened to, but I could not get to it, so I just used a pry bar to get the cooler moved away from engine block enough so that I could pull it away from the exhaust pipe. The two threaded rods at the exhaust port side are perpendicular to the on that is on to the engine case.
  13. At this point, I was able to get the unit out and discover that it was 100% plugged up with carbon.
  14. Plug the exhaust port side and start filling it up with brake cleaner from the top. You might be lucky that yours might not be this bad, but just be prepared.
  15. Take a few good pictures to help you put it back together the way it is supposed to go and start taking the EGR valve apart. If the cooler was plugged up, the valve is going to be equally bad, but it can be cleaned in less time then it would take you to order new parts and wait for them to be delivered.
  16. Last but very important part, take a 16 inch long length of the 16gauge steel wire, cut one end so that it has a burr or some deformity. Clamp it into your drill driver and start going at one hole at a time, be patient, it will clean out the holes.
  17. Do it once for all the holes and watch the brake cleaner just coming straight out of the other side, cleaning the residual carbon deposits with it. At this point take a look at your cuts and bruises on your hands and smile.
  18. Repeat the wire cleaning procedure a couple of time till you see no more carbon residue coming out OR you run out of time. I ran out of time, so simply put it back together.
  19. Putting the unit back in the car, I decided to NOT mount the lower 12MM bolt because it gave me the deepest scratch, take that you little 12MM. Jokes apart, I think the mounting of this unit is an overkill as it is secured at five points, IMO, four mounting points should be OK, we shall see.
  20. Start with the threaded bolt that is the top mount on engine, slide the cooler bracket and just start the 12MM bolt, to be able to do this, you would have to get the two threaded bolts on to the exhaust pipe flange.
  21. Tighten the exhaust side bolts using the ratcheting spanner, then the long threaded bot on to the EGR valve, tighten the bolt abd lastly tighten the 12MM on to the engine case.
  22. Re slide the hoses followed by the spring clamps.
  23. Attach the air filter housing
  24. Attache the EGR pipe, which I hope you cleaned, it is easy.
  25. Double check all the hoses and I forgot to mention, the electrical connector that you unplugged, should be plugged back on.
  26. Say a small prayer to synergy gods and push that button, wait for it to say ready, wait for the engine to turn on, let it go through it's motions and after about five minutes, the CEL should disappear.

    The one threaded bolt that you did not put back on the block, mail it to Toyota with a picture of your busted up knuckles. They will appreciate it.
    To remove the part, it took me about three hours because I followed the N&B video on you tube, and then I realized that I didn't have to take the plastic shroud off. Thankfully, I did not remove any of the wiper motors or any of that stuff.
The car is running great now, still has a bit of knocking when accelerating hard, but that is because of the age of this engine. I do not think that I will end up with a rod breaking through the engine case. That is the hope, but who knows.
Next on the list is replacing the PCR valve, intake manifold gasket, spark plugs and an oil change.
Thanks you all for this forum and free exchange of ideas.
 

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13' CT with 17' F Sport Rear
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Did you note the codes that it had?
Hello,
I needed to get my teen a cool ride that is safe as well.
I suggested Prius, he warned me that he would never talk to me again. I showed him pictures of CT and he fell for it.
It has close to 150K, drove it from a dealership that was three hours away and came with a five day money back guarantee.I got the pre purchase inspection done at a local, independent shop and the report came back "great"
Day six, the infamous rattle at startup and the bright yellow CEL, so I spent the last weekend taking care of that. The car seems to be driving much better, no rattling start, or may be I am being optimistic and the MPG is now up by five. This morning I got 48 on freeway.
Here are the steps:
  1. Tools needed for getting the valve and the cooling unit off
    1. 10mm, 12mm sockets with appropriate ratchets
    2. 12 mm ratcheting spanner
    3. 6mm Socket to remove the threaded rod that screws into the engine case and then you put the 12mm nut on it.
    4. Phillips head screwdriver
    5. crooked pliers to release the pressure from hose clamps
    6. old grocery plastic bags to be used as plugs to prevent the coolant from gushing out and a large
    7. flat lid of a big plastic tote to be used to catch little bit of coolant that will eventually drip out.
  2. Cleaning supplies and DIY tools
    1. Parts and brake cleaner, get ten cans. I used eight
    2. Steel wire, 16 gauge. Make sure it is steel, not aluminum or copper. You need it to drive through the plugged up holes in the cooler.
    3. Drill driver to rotate the wire as you clean each hole
The steps I followed
  1. Please do not undertake this if the engine is hot. I started the process with the car parked overnight.
  2. The EGR pipe that comes into the filter housing, has a plastic cover, move the wiring harness aside and remove the 10mm bolt that holds the plastic case in place. It is secured on to the EGR pipe flange.
  3. Now you can see the two 10mm bolts that secure the EGR pipe to the filter housing, remove them.
  4. Remove the air filter housing by undoing the clips and then taking out the two 10MM bolts that hold the whole thing in place, leave the bolts in the plastic housing.
  5. Loosen the hose clam and just rotate it 180 degrees so it's out of the way. I did not take it off, didn't need to.
  6. Move on to the EGR valve side and remove the two 10mm bolts that will let you get the pipe off, set it aside along with the five 10MM bolts.
  7. The EGR valve has a 12mm nut that secures it o the engine block, remove that and follow it up by removing the threaded rod with a 6mm socket head.
  8. The EGR valve is secured to the cooler, the rectangular SS box that brings in exhaust gases back to the engine, now this thing has four 12 mm bolts, the first one to take off is on top of the cooler, you will see a SS bracket that is mounted on to the engine case.
  9. The next two you want to tackle are at the connection between this part and a tube coming from the exhaust system. You will need a ratcheting spanner, 12MM, will need to lay on the engine, stick your arm behind the block and then get the spanner on the bolt.
  10. As you are doing the above steps, keep removing the hoses that are connected to this cooler, keep a ball of plastic bag ready and plug the hole to avoid spills, worked well for me.
  11. The last bolt is underneath the cooler and it is really easy to get to if you have the right size socket with the right size extension. When looking down at the part, you can see the top of the bracket, the bolt is right below that. I did not have the right size extension, but managed with what I had.
  12. Ideally, you want to remove the threaded rod that the lower bolt is fastened to, but I could not get to it, so I just used a pry bar to get the cooler moved away from engine block enough so that I could pull it away from the exhaust pipe. The two threaded rods at the exhaust port side are perpendicular to the on that is on to the engine case.
  13. At this point, I was able to get the unit out and discover that it was 100% plugged up with carbon.
  14. Plug the exhaust port side and start filling it up with brake cleaner from the top. You might be lucky that yours might not be this bad, but just be prepared.
  15. Take a few good pictures to help you put it back together the way it is supposed to go and start taking the EGR valve apart. If the cooler was plugged up, the valve is going to be equally bad, but it can be cleaned in less time then it would take you to order new parts and wait for them to be delivered.
  16. Last but very important part, take a 16 inch long length of the 16gauge steel wire, cut one end so that it has a burr or some deformity. Clamp it into your drill driver and start going at one hole at a time, be patient, it will clean out the holes.
  17. Do it once for all the holes and watch the brake cleaner just coming straight out of the other side, cleaning the residual carbon deposits with it. At this point take a look at your cuts and bruises on your hands and smile.
  18. Repeat the wire cleaning procedure a couple of time till you see no more carbon residue coming out OR you run out of time. I ran out of time, so simply put it back together.
  19. Putting the unit back in the car, I decided to NOT mount the lower 12MM bolt because it gave me the deepest scratch, take that you little 12MM. Jokes apart, I think the mounting of this unit is an overkill as it is secured at five points, IMO, four mounting points should be OK, we shall see.
  20. Start with the threaded bolt that is the top mount on engine, slide the cooler bracket and just start the 12MM bolt, to be able to do this, you would have to get the two threaded bolts on to the exhaust pipe flange.
  21. Tighten the exhaust side bolts using the ratcheting spanner, then the long threaded bot on to the EGR valve, tighten the bolt abd lastly tighten the 12MM on to the engine case.
  22. Re slide the hoses followed by the spring clamps.
  23. Attach the air filter housing
  24. Attache the EGR pipe, which I hope you cleaned, it is easy.
  25. Double check all the hoses and I forgot to mention, the electrical connector that you unplugged, should be plugged back on.
  26. Say a small prayer to synergy gods and push that button, wait for it to say ready, wait for the engine to turn on, let it go through it's motions and after about five minutes, the CEL should disappear.

    The one threaded bolt that you did not put back on the block, mail it to Toyota with a picture of your busted up knuckles. They will appreciate it.
    To remove the part, it took me about three hours because I followed the N&B video on you tube, and then I realized that I didn't have to take the plastic shroud off. Thankfully, I did not remove any of the wiper motors or any of that stuff.
The car is running great now, still has a bit of knocking when accelerating hard, but that is because of the age of this engine. I do not think that I will end up with a rod breaking through the engine case. That is the hope, but who knows.
Next on the list is replacing the PCR valve, intake manifold gasket, spark plugs and an oil change.
Thanks you all for this forum and free exchange of ideas.
if you were smart you would have added an oil catch can.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Just learning about the car. But this morning the rattling sequence was the longest..I think I am pretty sure I have a toast on my hands.....
 

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2015 eminent white pearl
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I could not, the cel went away once I fixed the EGR, but since this evening, it is back.
I might have a bought a lemon.
We shall see....
The CEL was most likely for a misfire. The system has a code specifically for the egr system, but you would only know that if you were able to read the codes. All is not lost yet. Whatever you do, DO NOT let it bang and clunk. Turn it off as soon as it misfires. Check for signs of head gasket leak (coolant loss, coating on plugs, loss of system pressure, etc.) Take out the plugs and examine them. If they are the original, you may want to change them to the "hotter" updated ones (stay with OEM). Have a look at the pcv and intake side for signs of oil in the throttle body. If there is oil pooling under the throttle body, it probably means there is oil entering the intake from the pcv and fouling your plugs.
If the gasket is gone from previous prolonged misfire by previous owner, you will need a top end reseal, but it will happen again if you don't mitigate things that cause fouling and misfires. A catch can would be helpful.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
The CEL was most likely for a misfire. The system has a code specifically for the egr system, but you would only know that if you were able to read the codes. All is not lost yet. Whatever you do, DO NOT let it bang and clunk. Turn it off as soon as it misfires. Check for signs of head gasket leak (coolant loss, coating on plugs, loss of system pressure, etc.) Take out the plugs and examine them. If they are the original, you may want to change them to the "hotter" updated ones (stay with OEM). Have a look at the pcv and intake side for signs of oil in the throttle body. If there is oil pooling under the throttle body, it probably means there is oil entering the intake from the pcv and fouling your plugs.
If the gasket is gone from previous prolonged misfire by previous owner, you will need a top end reseal, but it will happen again if you don't mitigate things that cause fouling and misfires. A catch can would be helpful.
I do need to drive it about three miles to get it back to the house...
Will do the plugs and clean the intake manifold and replace the PCV vale....No coolant loss and no froth in the engine oil so far....
 

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I do need to drive it about three miles to get it back to the house...
Will do the plugs and clean the intake manifold and replace the PCV vale....No coolant loss and no froth in the engine oil so far....
Also, the pcv is going to let oil pass no matter what if you fill the oil to the full mark. Only way to stop it is to install a oil catch can. There probably nothing wrong with the pcv. Its the oil level and design. I personally have not had the clunking since I stopped filling to the full line and fill to 3/4 of way between marks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I think you are spot on. After I read your message, I checked oil level and it is any an inch above the full mark.
I can bet at the last oil change, all five quarts was emptied into the engine. I plan to tackle that tomorrow once I figure out how to raise the car.

Since I had ordered the PCB valve, decided to replace the plugs, pcv and cleaned the intake manifold.
It started with a brief clank but soon seed into a nice smooth idling. I stopped and started it multiple times, no clanking.

Hoping for the best.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Nope, but I will get those and replace the NGKs I put in last night
The plugs that came out looked great except #1, closest to the EGR pipe.
The intake manifold was pretty dirty too especially the exhaust had ports.
I think I Will replace the ignition coils with the denso spark plugs you suggested.
Thanks for all your help
 

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The egr recirculates things that weren't burned during the initial combustion hoping they would burn the second time around. That they shoot it nearest to one cylinder instead of evenly distributing it among all cylinder is weird, but it does explain the build up on the #1. Add to that the oil being sucked in which also contributes to the coating and fouling. It was only a matter of miles until it began to misfire. Remember, after all is cleaned, either install a oil catch can, or only fill 3/4 of the way up to the full mark on the dipstick.

I think I may have been better to have a dirty or even partially blocked egr cooler to slow down or catch trash from being blown back in to the intake😆.

This problem is only REALLY bad if it is left to go on, but I'd caught in time, the car can be saved without replacing the gasket.

For future readers, misfire on #1 should be the sign that fouling build up has reached a critical level (if the coil is still good). To prolong the engine and prevent it, a oil catch can or slightly underfilling the the oil should be practiced.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
"either install a oil catch can, or only fill 3/4 of the way up to the full mark on the dipstick"

I will start with less oil first. By the way, the car is running great now.
 

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"either install a oil catch can, or only fill 3/4 of the way up to the full mark on the dipstick"

I will start with less oil first. By the way, the car is running great now.
Damn, you got it done asap! So, no more hesitation? No more clunk and banging on start up? And without a top end reseal?? My man!
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Yup.....so far but keeping my fingers crossed.
The car had two previous owners and has extensive service records. I am thinking the first sign of knocking, it was traded in and somehow ended up in Minnesota, which is where I bought it.
What is a top end reseal?
 

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Yup.....so far but keeping my fingers crossed.
The car had two previous owners and has extensive service records. I am thinking the first sign of knocking, it was traded in and somehow ended up in Minnesota, which is where I bought it.
What is a top end reseal?
New head gasket.
 

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I know. Someone else noted that this car doesn't inherently have head gasket issues. Which I am beginning to agree with. It is due to prolonged fouling and the infamous bang and clunking at start up that eventually destroys the bottom end or the gasket. Well, lets hope the fix is good. Keep us posted.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
OK, So in the past week or so, I have done the following:
  1. Cleaned the EGR cooler, Light could be seen clearly through the fins.
  2. Cleaned the EGR valve as well as the tube.
  3. Replaced the plugs
    It ran great for a day but the same evening I heard the rattle again.
  4. Cleaned the intake manifold really well including the ports in the manifold that bring in the gas from EGR
  5. Drained the old, overfilled oil and filled it to the right level, below the full mark.
  6. Swapped number one coil with number four cylinder coil.
Just came back after a 60 mile trip and the engine started and stopped many times. No rattle so far but I am not too sure how long it will stay like this.
When I am taking off from a stop, there is a gurgling sound for about two to three seconds. I thought I might have left the cap on the coolant reservoir loose, so check it but I am just perplexed about this new sound. It's almost like pouring liquid into an empty bottle....
Any thoughts?
 

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OK, So in the past week or so, I have done the following:
  1. Cleaned the EGR cooler, Light could be seen clearly through the fins.
  2. Cleaned the EGR valve as well as the tube.
  3. Replaced the plugs
    It ran great for a day but the same evening I heard the rattle again.
  4. Cleaned the intake manifold really well including the ports in the manifold that bring in the gas from EGR
  5. Drained the old, overfilled oil and filled it to the right level, below the full mark.
  6. Swapped number one coil with number four cylinder coil.
Just came back after a 60 mile trip and the engine started and stopped many times. No rattle so far but I am not too sure how long it will stay like this.
When I am taking off from a stop, there is a gurgling sound for about two to three seconds. I thought I might have left the cap on the coolant reservoir loose, so check it but I am just perplexed about this new sound. It's almost like pouring liquid into an empty bottle....
Any thoughts?
Can you give a good recording? Also, where is it coming from?
 
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