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Good find bondguy. 20% more likely to hit a pedestrian, yikes! This is probably why the 2012's come with beepers when driving in EV mode.
 

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Bondguy - great thread name!

Funny, I actually read a similar article at lunch 1/2 hr. ago: Bottom Line - Hybrids safer than comparable gas-powered cars

Call me crazy, but if these cars are resulting in a higher rate of hits to pedestrians, I get that it's because the cars are virtually silent when in EV mode, but wouldn't they be entirely avoided if pedestrians looked before stepping into a roadway?
 

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but wouldn't they be entirely avoided if pedestrians looked before stepping into a roadway?
Seconded ... I've had one person tell me to be careful in car parks because they've had "I didn't hear it" issues with other hybrids and another declared that he hated hybrids because he'd nearly been run over by one that came from a different direction to where he was looking.

What's next ? Anyone with a quiet car needs to have a man walking in front with a red flag ?

You can probably guess what I think of people who don't look before stepping into areas where cars might be ...

Think they're on to something with the "More weight = less damage" thing, although I suspect that's the cars being built better than the average box with wheels. My CT definitely feels more solid than the Focus I replaced.
 

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Bicycles are far more likely to be coming at you from completely mysterious directions too ...

Cars are stuck to roads. Bikes will mow you down on the pavement.

(that scraping you hear is the sound of my axe grinding :D)
 

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By that reasoning, bicycles need to be outlawed. You don't notice them at all if you're not looking out!
And they also seem to pride themselves in not giving any warning at all and then getting incensed that you didn't move out of the way.
 

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On Your Left

"On Your Left" is bicycle courtesy. Most true bicycle riders are courteous, please don't stereotype and judge all bicycle riders based on a few discourteous riders.

Concerning the article, I always find it humor when magazine writers or reporters try to use percentages. They should read the book "How to Lie with Statistics" because they are almost always wrong and off-base. Come-on what is the basis of their report, I personally think it is a complete SWAG.
 

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"On Your Left" is bicycle courtesy. Most true bicycle riders are courteous, please don't stereotype and judge all bicycle riders based on a few discourteous riders.

Concerning the article, I always find it humor when magazine writers or reporters try to use percentages. They should read the book "How to Lie with Statistics" because they are almost always wrong and off-base. Come-on what is the basis of their report, I personally think it is a complete SWAG.
I wholeheartedly agree with you, Midcow3. Numbers can be manipulated to substantiate any outcome the researcher decides they want to win or lose. Statistics don’t really lie, but they can be bent way out of proportion and in many different ways.
 

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"On Your Left" is bicycle courtesy. Most true bicycle riders are courteous, please don't stereotype and judge all bicycle riders based on a few discourteous riders.

Concerning the article, I always find it humor when magazine writers or reporters try to use percentages. They should read the book "How to Lie with Statistics" because they are almost always wrong and off-base. Come-on what is the basis of their report, I personally think it is a complete SWAG.
I live on a road that is frequented by bikers. I walk on or near a bicycle path twice a day and have for the past 37 years. I can count on the fingers of one hand the number of bike riders who have said "On the left" or "on the right" in those years. I think it has been about two years since someone dinged a little bell at me. Usually it is just a woosh as they go by and a dirty look because I didn't sense them. I don't think it is a stereotype. I think it is a disease. On the other hand, serious bikers, who eschew the bike path for the road surfaces suffer from a totally different illness. It is wanting to be a vehicle when it is convenient but reverting to a non vehicle when some inconvenience (like a traffic light or waiting traffic) looms ahead. Make up your mind! If you want to be treated like a vehicle, then follow the rules, like staying in a lane, stopping for lights, yielding the right of way, etc etc and don't ride in groups of 50 or more unless you have made prior arrangements.

Having said that, I understand the need for bicyclists to be very defensive and careful in traffic, since many people just refuse to notice them, even when eye contact is made. Motorcyclists suffer the same fate. Cutting corners sure doesn't help.
 

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I live on a road that is frequented by bikers. I walk on or near a bicycle path twice a day and have for the past 37 years. I can count on the fingers of one hand the number of bike riders who have said "On the left" or "on the right" in those years. I think it has been about two years since someone dinged a little bell at me. Usually it is just a woosh as they go by and a dirty look because I didn't sense them. I don't think it is a stereotype. I think it is a disease. On the other hand, serious bikers, who eschew the bike path for the road surfaces suffer from a totally different illness. It is wanting to be a vehicle when it is convenient but reverting to a non vehicle when some inconvenience (like a traffic light or waiting traffic) looms ahead. Make up your mind! If you want to be treated like a vehicle, then follow the rules, like staying in a lane, stopping for lights, yielding the right of way, etc etc and don't ride in groups of 50 or more unless you have made prior arrangements.

Having said that, I understand the need for bicyclists to be very defensive and careful in traffic, since many people just refuse to notice them, even when eye contact is made. Motorcyclists suffer the same fate. Cutting corners sure doesn't help.
Joe166,

You may be right and that is sad now-a-days. I started riding bikes "a lot" in 1976 and back then everyone was courteous. I haven't ridden much in the last 5-8 years, but I have noticed there is much less courtesy and willingness to help fellow bikers and to respect pedestrians and other vehicles. I guess I was just reminiscing back to the good ole days

Take Care,

MidCow3
 
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