Lexus CT200h Forums banner

1 - 20 of 120 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I live in Seattle-WA and I am expecting some snow again. I am wondering has anyone drived this car in snow ? how was the handling ?

I am also concerned on the front bumper as its too close to the road and just worried that snow will damage this ? Although I do have the 3m film protection on front!!

Has anyone tried snow tires during the snow season ?

Any word of advise ?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
I live in Bellevue, as far as I know, CT isn't suit for driving in snow.
Don't risk yourself, drive the other car during snow days.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
875 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
115 Posts
i just had an *interesting* experience this past weekend with a snowstorm that hit the Northeast (you might have heard of it?). i would NOT recommend driving the CT in unplowed streets of snow with the OEM all-weather tires. having said that, i made it to the mall and back (~10 mins of highway and local roads) with minimal slippage and 1-2" on the ground.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
209 Posts
My Lexus dealer has just supplied and fitted a set of Hankook i*cept evo tyres to my CT.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
486 Posts
I've driven almost all my cars with all season tires only up until last winter when I finally got some snow tires.

I don't agree with that fact that you NEED snow tires, you can get along with all seasons if you drive carefully, but snow tires definitely do help and make a big difference.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
283 Posts
I live in Bellevue, as far as I know, CT isn't suit for driving in snow.
Don't risk yourself, drive the other car during snow days.
It's no worse then a Prius or any other car. Put snow tires on and your all set. The fuel efficent tires are a harder compound with little to no cross sipes for traction so all you do with them is slide.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
Even if you drive carefully, 4 saisons tires in area that have ice and snow on a regular base, you need winter tires. Even carefully, I don't think you go down a hill on an icy roard safely for you and other drivers.

Just as exemple in mountains you can have a dry road on one side when going up and black ice at the top when going down. Very dangerous with any winter tires, and with four seasons, I wish not be in the car.

I can't wait to get some reviews in snow with good snow tires to see how the CT will handle in snow.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
121 Posts
I am mostly with hdave on this one - typical Canadian neutrality ;)
I live in Winnipeg, Manitoba Canada - nicknamed Winterpeg due it's ocassional -40C temps and snow and dubious title as coldest major city (over half a million) in the world! I have driven all kinds of cars and SUVs with and without snow tires. Snow tires really help you stop quciker no doubt about that. And all kinds of factors come into play but even with my cars/SUVs without snow tires I can stop 99% of the time without problems (by adjusting my driving habits). Now keep in mind we are on the flattest part of the praries there is so there are no hill (let alone mountain) issues. The thing I always worry about is someone that hasn't adjusted their habits rear ending me so I leave a good 6 feet at least in front of a car I am stopped behind and then watch my rear view mirror for some clown slidding at me - this way I can slowly roll forward if I see him running out of room.
Now having said that, I am going to be buying snow tires for my CT for sure as I agree with the low rolling tire comment in that they probably perform worse in snow and ice than regular all seasons. I was looking at Michelen Xice but I see that they are low rolling resistence too so might go with the Blizzaks as I have had them before.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
283 Posts
I am mostly with hdave on this one - typical Canadian neutrality ;)
I live in Winnipeg, Manitoba Canada - nicknamed Winterpeg due it's ocassional -40C temps and snow and dubious title as coldest major city (over half a million) in the world! I have driven all kinds of cars and SUVs with and without snow tires. Snow tires really help you stop quciker no doubt about that. And all kinds of factors come into play but even with my cars/SUVs without snow tires I can stop 99% of the time without problems (by adjusting my driving habits). Now keep in mind we are on the flattest part of the praries there is so there are no hill (let alone mountain) issues. The thing I always worry about is someone that hasn't adjusted their habits rear ending me so I leave a good 6 feet at least in front of a car I am stopped behind and then watch my rear view mirror for some clown slidding at me - this way I can slowly roll forward if I see him running out of room.
Now having said that, I am going to be buying snow tires for my CT for sure as I agree with the low rolling tire comment in that they probably perform worse in snow and ice than regular all seasons. I was looking at Michelen Xice but I see that they are low rolling resistence too so might go with the Blizzaks as I have had them before.
I went with the Blizzak's, haven't mounted them yet as my Trident wheels just came in so I want to do all the swaps at once e.g Winters on the OEM and summers on the Trident F-Sport wheels.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
875 Posts
Just a curiousity question. When I lived where there was snow and ice and lots of Black Ice, snow tires didn't really help with the black ice. We used to put on studded snow tires. Do people still use studded snow tires ? and if not how do you handle black ice conditions. Good luck and be safe everyone in the coming winter months.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
180 Posts
Just a curiousity question. When I lived where there was snow and ice and lots of Black Ice, snow tires didn't really help with the black ice. We used to put on studded snow tires. Do people still use studded snow tires ? and if not how do you handle black ice conditions. Good luck and be safe everyone in the coming winter months.
Modern high-end snow tires, like Bridgstone Blizzaks or Michelin X-Ice tires, are made from special extra-pliable rubber compounds that really grip effectively on ice. These arn't your grandfather's snow tires. :cool:

Studs are a very effective (though noisy) option. However, they aren't legal in Ontario. (apparently, they really chew up the roads)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
414 Posts
Just a curiousity question. When I lived where there was snow and ice and lots of Black Ice, snow tires didn't really help with the black ice. We used to put on studded snow tires. Do people still use studded snow tires ? and if not how do you handle black ice conditions. Good luck and be safe everyone in the coming winter months.
In Ontario we are not allowed to use studded tires. But experienced drivers know black ice conditions and we drive accordingly.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
875 Posts
In Ontario we are not allowed to use studded tires. But experienced drivers know black ice conditions and we drive accordingly.
Yes, I understand you have the conditions much more frequently and therefore would handle the situations better.

The black ice conditions I used to encounter were in the morning. No snow or ice and roads were completely clear until you would come upon a patch of black ice. Now obviously, you roll over if you can and don't brake or accelerate. However sometimes the black ice is on a curve or downhill where you would normally slow. Since the rest of the roads are completely clear everyone drives the normal speed. Sometimes this results in accidents when the black ice is unexpectedly encountered. Just curious, how would Ontario drivers 'drive according' in similar situations ?

Studded snow tires cut through the black ice and stop. Regular tires and/or snow tires skid and slid.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
45 Posts
Worst car I've ever driven in the snow. It's the combination of the sports car tires and the non-defeatable traction control. Get snow tires.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
45 Posts
you shouldn't drive any car in snowy areas w/o snow tires, period
My Acura RDX came with Michelin all-season OEM tires. Best car or truck I've ever driven in the snow, and I piloted that sled through some unbelievable blizzards on unplowed roads. I made it to the local ski hill here over 15 miles of 12"+ unplowed roads with deeper drifts in the intersections. No snow tires. The Acura SH-AWD system is about the best on the market today.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
875 Posts
My Acura RDX came with Michelin all-season OEM tires. Best car or truck I've ever driven in the snow, and I piloted that sled through some unbelievable blizzards on unplowed roads. I made it to the local ski hill here over 15 miles of 12"+ unplowed roads with deeper drifts in the intersections. No snow tires. The Acura SH-AWD system is about the best on the market today.
Best car in snow and ice I have ever driven; 5-speed manual 1974 Audi LS100. Would go up ice covered hills with regular tires when other cars were in the ditch. However, it was a very unreliable car; all the service people knew me on a first name basis.

Worst car, Four speed manual, 1970 Oldsmobile 442 with 455 cubic inch 365 horspower engine with anti-spin. Best to park it in the winter, period! Even tires didn't help it! Second worst car 1998, five speed manual, BMW M3 even with traction control and DSC.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
708 Posts
Worst car I've ever driven in the snow. It's the combination of the sports car tires and the non-defeatable traction control. Get snow tires.
The 17" tires on the Ct are not "sports" car tires, whatever that means, by any stretch of the imagination. They are designed to improve mpg.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
414 Posts
Just curious, how would Ontario drivers 'drive according' in similar situations ?

Studded snow tires cut through the black ice and stop. Regular tires and/or snow tires skid and slid.
Black ice will develop based on the temperature and conditions. A lot of the time we actually get black ice warnings. And if you're going too fast, well nothing will work in our area since we don't have studs.
 
1 - 20 of 120 Posts
Top