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Well, are you talking about the 12 volt battery, or the hybrid battery? That price sounds like the hybrid battery, but leaving the dome light on would run out the 12 volt battery, which should be much cheaper to replace.
Im a goof. You are right it was the 12 volt battery, however i learned the hard way that doing the old trick of a 15 minute highway drive to recharge the battery does not work afyer a hybrid jumpstart. The only thing that revived my 12V battery after a jump was leaving my hybrid car idle for 8 hours to get a proper recharge on tge 12V. i discovered this trick after digging around on the web. All is good now, and my car niw starts reliably.

thanks for your reply.
 

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Batteries on Toyota hybrids last the life of the vehicle. Period. They last longer then conventional transmissions and engine. The reason for this is the small change in battery state-of-charge as the hybrid is operating. You can call that change in SOC or delta SOC. By making the delta SOC small, the energy that goes in and out of the battery is small and therefore makes the life of the battery nice and long.

Lexus and Toyota warranty their hybrid batteries for 8 years of 160,000km. But battery replacements on Toyota hybrids is very very very uncommon.

The cost to replace the battery is approx $2500-$3000. Like an engine or transmission. But again. As I've mentioned. These batteries simply don't fail.

The main reason why people think these batteries would have to be replaced is because of their day-to-day familiarity with batteries of only one kind: those in small electrical items like cell phones, remote controllers, radio controlled toys etc. And with that day-to-day experience and familiarity comes the notion that batteries fail and need to be replaced.

That's not the case with these hybrid batteries.


Your second concern. The CT200h uses regular fuel. If you are DRIVING "green" in the summer/spring months you should be able to get 4.7L/100km. From the "empty light" (which leaves about 10-12L of fuel remaining in the tank) you can fill up 33-36L of fuel and that will net you about 680-720km of driving in the spring/summer/fall.

As with ALL cars, as soon as you get below 5 degC or even 0degC or -10degC, the fuel consumption is higher and sits around 5.8-6.0L/100km and nets you about 550km.
The hybrid battery in our 2012 CT200h died this month. Cost $4500 to replace.
 

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2012 Lexus CT200h Premium Navi
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Mine (2012 MY, 264k mi)as well in May began having issues. I’ve been limping along with reduced HV battery capacity and a 10% reduction in fuel economy. It still works and sometimes triggers a hybrid system warning message, but I reset it to prolong the use of original battery. I’ll replace it when I tire of resetting it or if it’s no longer possible. I’ve been told the HV battery will eventually degrade until it won’t start the engine anymore.

I suspect kicking the car out of the garage this winter may have accelerated its end of life.
 

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I always drive my car until I throw them out
1978 Monte Carlo - 15 yrs
1987 Camry LE - 20 yrs
1994 Mercury Villager - 21 yrs
1996 MB E-320 ... still driving ... it's like a tank, will last forever
1997 Maxima ... still driving... around town and winter car
2007 RAV4 ... still driving ... great car
2015 CT200h ... still driving... love this little guy
I have 2012 CT200 it runs 220k miles, still driving. I’m afraid of my little guy will loos power when I drive on the highway, I’m looking for is there any sign or note I should be careful :it’s time to throw away or trade in new car?
 
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